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Steven Gerrard talks about the pressures that a Liverpool Captain must endure.

In a new book, Steven Gerrard tells us whatas it is like to be the captain of Liverpool FC and the challenges he faced during his tenure withAthe Reds

The 36 year old Liverpool legend was very frank and gave his two centsAof what the role entails to, in the newly released book called Liverpool Captains. Gerrard also warned current captain Jordan Henderson thatAheAwill have to be very thick skinned and to only accept the armband if he’s ready for the pressure that will come with it.

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Gerrard who left his boyhood club afterA17 oddAyears last year for the MLS, having taken the armband himself in 2003 as a 23 year old, certainly knows what the responsibility entails. As a captain, the former Liverpool and England skipper has lifted both the Champions league and the FA cup, inspiring his side to comebacks in spectacular fashion. StevenAGerrard did admit that he felt the fan’s scrutiny on him more than most, but he also said that he thrived on the pressure that came with leading his team out – even on the unlucky days, as he watched as his last chance at the Premier League title slip away…

Gerrard watches as his last game ends in a 6-1 thrashing by Stoke City
Gerrard watches as his last game ends in a 6-1 thrashing by Stoke City

Quoted in Ragnhild Lund’s new book, Gerrard said “You need to be thick-skinned to be captain. Before you accept the responsibility of being captain for Liverpool Football Club youave got to tell yourself: a?There will be good days and bad days.’

a?On good days youall feel on top of the world. On bad days youall feel sad and lonely. If you canat handle the low days, when the s*** hits the fan and everyoneas out to get you, if you canat handle those days mentally, donat take the job.

a?Every single day, even when I wasnat playing badly, I felt that pressure. But I loved it, even on bad days. When wead had a bad game or if Iad played badly, I used to tell myself: a?Iam the captain. I need to put this right, and Iall have another chance to do that in three or four days.a

a?I dreamed about wearing the captainas armband from when I was about 10. So when I got it, I wanted to enjoy it, even on bad days.a?

Jamie Redknapp takes a shot on goal
Jamie Redknapp takes a shot on goal

Steven Gerrard also saidAthat he owes a great deal to both Jamie Redknapp and Robbie Fowler, the then captain of the Reds during Gerrard’s formative yearsAat Anfield.Aa?Redknapp was my hero. I love him as a guy and I loved him as a player. He went out of his way to help me.” said the 36 year old.

a?I was 16 and an apprentice on A?47 a week. And he was a national star who played for England and LFC and was vice-captain under Paul Ince.

“Every day head call me over and check on me if I was all right, if I had the football boots and the equipment that I needed. And head tell me where he was off to after training and ask me to join him. He didnat have to do that.”

a?When someone behaves like that to you at 16, it does something important to you. So when I was 26 and I was captain, Iad treat younger players the way Jamie had.a?

Liverpool's Steven Gerrard celebrates after scoring in 2013
Liverpool’s Steven Gerrard celebrates after scoring in 2013

Steven Gerrard was one of the 16 former Liverpool captains that the Norwegian author Ragnhild Lund had interviewed over a period of 3 years. The writer spent that time travelling around Europe, speaking and interviewing some of the biggest names in the club’s history. The author said that he wanted to analyseAhow the captaincy role had changed and evolved over the years.

There are incredible chapters about Ron Yeats and Tommy Smith, both who suffer from Alzheimer’s, about the sacrifices they endured. The book also features players like Graeme Souness, Ronnie Whelan, Paul Ince, Redknapp, Fowler, Sami Hyypia, Jamie Carragher and many many more players.

 

 

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